The deposition is a critical part of personal injury proceedings, and it could affect the outcome of your case. As such, it is important that you prepare for your deposition under the guidance of an experienced attorney.

During the deposition, you will have to answer questions from the defendant’s attorney. A court reporter will record a transcript of your deposition, and the court can later refer to it to identify inconsistencies or to evaluate other elements of your case.

As the Legal Information Institute explains, the deposition is part of the discovery phase. Deposition testimony is typically hearsay and is thus inadmissible at trial, but the court may still use the transcripts to identify any discrepancies and follow up with either party regarding the inconsistencies in question.

Although your legal team cannot coach you on your answers, they can answer any questions you have about the discovery phase so you know what to expect. If you would like to discuss your case with a personal injury lawyer in Marksville, turn to the Laborde Earles Law Firm.

An accident attorney will gather evidence, interview witnesses, calculate your damages, and help you navigate the claims process. Call 800-522-6733 today to schedule a free initial consultation.

Read on to learn four tips to keep in mind during your deposition:

  1. Remain Professional

The deposition will follow a standard question and answer format. It is not supposed to be conversational, and you should not volunteer any information that the opposing party’s counsel does not ask for directly.

You can avoid compromising your case by remaining professional at all times. Do not joke around or make small talk during the deposition because it can only harm your case.

  1. Be Honest When in Doubt

Do not attempt to fabricate an answer when you are confused or uncertain. You are allowed to say “I do not remember” or “I do not know” if either is true.

  1. Quantify Your Injuries

Quantify your injuries whenever you can. Provide details about your symptoms, and describe your pain on a scale of 1 to 10. If you are unsure how to describe your pain, consider the differences between words like dull and sharp, constant and intermittent, and throbbing and steady.

  1. Listen Carefully to Each Question

Listen to the entire question before you answer. If a simple “yes” or “no” will suffice, then do not elaborate. Your answers should be accurate yet as brief as possible.

Personal injury law is complicated, and the deposition is just one component of the proceedings. An accident attorney from the Laborde Earles Law Firm can help you navigate the claims process and avoid costly mistakes.

Call 800-522-6733 today to schedule a free initial consultation with a personal injury lawyer in Marksville. You can learn more about personal injury claims in Louisiana by visiting the USAttorneys website.